Media Kits

“Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission.”

February 1, 2017

The Apollo 11 command module Columbia—the only portion of the historic spacecraft to complete the first mission to land a man on the moon and safely return him to Earth—will leave the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum for the first time in 46 years.

Astronauts in front of Command module
Related photos: 

Destination Moon: Apollo 11 Astronauts

B&W photo of 3 astronauts with command module

National Air and Space Museum / Smithsonian Institution

Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins pose in front of the Columbia at the National Air and Space Museum in 1979.

National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution 

Destination Moon: Apollo Command Module

Command Module on display

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

Apollo 11 command module Columbia on temporary cradle.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

 

Destination Moon: Buzz Aldrin

Aldrin on the moon

Photo courtesy of NASA

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA).

Photo courtesy of NASA

Destination Moon: Chronograph

Watch

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

Astronaut Michael Collins wore the Omega Speedmaster Chronograph during the Apollo 11 mission.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

 

Destination Moon: Columbia Hatch

Overhead view of hatch

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

The hatch served as the entry and exit point to the command module Columbia on the launch pad and after landing.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Destination Moon: Command Module Interior

Command module interior

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

The interior of the Apollo 11 Command Module.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution 

Destination Moon: Gloves

Gloves

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

The extravehicular (EV) gloves made for and worn by astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 11 mission in July, 1969.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Destination Moon: Star Chart

Star Chart

National Air and Space Museum / Smithsonian Institution

The chart shows the positions of the sun, moon, and stars at the time Apollo 11 was scheduled to leave Earth orbit and head for the moon.

Credit: National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Destination Moon: Survival Kit

Survival kit and contents

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

One of two rucksacks filled with equipment to help the crew survive for up to 48 hours in the event of an emergency landing on Earth.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Destination Moon: Visor

Helmet visor

Eric Long / National Air and Space Museum

The extravehicular visor assembly worn by astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the lunar surface during the historic Apollo 11 mission in July, 1969.

Photo by Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution


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