Media Kits

Moving Beyond Earth

May 10, 2013

How can human spaceflight become routine, economical, practical and safe? How can a home and workplace be created in the extreme environment of space? What does the future hold for humans in space? Will people be able to travel to far-away worlds beyond the moon? Do the benefits of human spaceflight outweigh the risks and expense? “Moving Beyond Earth,” a new exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum, asks visitors to consider these questions and encourages them to follow the developing story of humans in space.

Related releases: 

First Stage of “Moving Beyond Earth” Opens at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

November 18, 2009

How can human spaceflight become routine, economical, practical and safe? How can a home and workplace be created in the extreme environment of space? What does the future hold for humans in space? Will people be able to travel to far-away worlds beyond the moon? Do the benefits of human spaceflight outweigh the risks and expense?

Related fact sheets: 

“Moving Beyond Earth” Curators

Roger D. Launius is a senior curator in the Department of Space History at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Between 1990 and 2002 he served as chief historian of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

“Moving Beyond Earth” Interactive Displays

Why use interactives? National Air and Space Museum visitors say they want to “experience” spaceflight and to learn what “it’s really like.” This gallery aims to respond to that yearning to participate in spaceflight while earthbound. IMAX films have given millions of viewers the virtual experience of spaceflight.

Related Staff Bios: 

John Dailey

Director, National Air and Space Museum

Gen. J.R. “Jack” Dailey, a retired U.S. Marine Corps four star general and pilot, assumed the duties of director of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in January 2000.

John Dailey

John R. (Jack) Dailey

John Dailey

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

General John R. Dailey, Director of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Related photos: 

Boeing Aviation Hangar

Dane Penland, Smithsonian

Interior view of the Aviation Hangar of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in 2005. View is from floor level beneath the first-floor catwalk spanning the center of the space, looking south toward the Air France Concorde in far background. Large aircraft in foreground are the Boeing 367-80 (left) and the CASA C-352L (Junkers Ju 52/3m, right).

Buzz Lightyear and Magellan T. Bear

Mark Avino, Smithsonian

Two space travelers share a locker in the mockup Space Shuttle Discovery mid-deck on display in the Moving Beyond Earth exhibition at the Museum in Washington, DC. In 2008, Buzz Lightyear flew on Space Shuttle Discovery STS-124 to the International Space Station and returned on Discovery 15 months later with STS-128. The 12-inch action figure is the longest-serving toy in space. Magellan T.

DARPA ARM and Robonaut 1

Mark Avino, Smithsonian

The DARPA Autonomous Robotic Manipulation robot "Robbie"developmental and the NASA/DARPA Robonaut 1A are both on display in the Moving Beyond Earth gallery.

Image Number: WEB12802-2013

Milestones of Flight Gallery

Eric Long, Smithsonian

Milestones of Flight gallery at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC.

Image Number: WEB11813-2011

Moving Beyond Earth

Eric Long, Smithsonian

Moving Beyond Earth becomes a live broadcast presentation center for engaging conversations with experts, astronauts, and special guests.

Image Number: WEB11287-2009

National Air and Space Museum

Photo: Smithsonian

Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall

Photo: Eric Long, Smithsonian

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. has hundreds of original, historic artifacts on display, including the 1903 Wright Flyer; the Spirit of St. Louis; the Apollo 11 command module Columbia; and a Lunar rock sample that visitors can touch.

Image Number: WEB11495-2010

Space Shuttle Discovery

Dane Penland, Smithsonian

The space shuttle Discovery is the centerpiece of the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va.

Image Number: WEB12606-2012

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

Dane Penland, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

The Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport in Virginia is the companion facility to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum

Photo: Eric Long, Smithsonian

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va.


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