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Smithsonian Collaborates with Team of Paleontologists to Reveal New Species of Large, Feathered Dinosaur

March 19, 2014

A team of scientists from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the University of Utah has described an unusual bird-like dinosaur previously unknown to science, resembling a cross between a modern emu and a reptile.

Oviraptorsaurius
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Hell Creek Discovery

Lamanna et al media art

An illustration of Anzu wyliei by Mark Klingler / Carnegie Museum of Natural History

An illustration of Anzu wyliei shows several striking anatomical features of the large, feathered dinosaur, including its long tail, feathered arms, toothless beak and a tall crest on the top of its skull.

Hell Creek Discovery

Tyler Lyson and Hans-Dieter Sues / Brittany Hance, Smithsonian Insitution

Smithsonian scientists, (from left) Tyler Lyson and Hans-Dieter Sues, examine a reconstructed Anzu wyliei skull.

Hell Creek Discovery

skull of Anzu wyliei

This reconstruction shows the skull of Anzu wyliei / Photo by James Di Loreto, Smithsonian Insitution

This reconstruction shows the skull of Anzu wyliei, including its large toothless beak, which suggests that the species may have been omnivorous.

Hell Creek discovery

Artist's rendering of Anzu wyliei

Artist's rendering of Anzu wyliei / Courtesy Robert Walters

An illustration of Anzu wyliei shows its long, slender ostrich-like neck and hind legs; unlike an ostrich, A. wyliei also had forelimbs that were tipped with large, sharp claws.

Hell Creek discovery

Sites in North and South Dakota where three Anzu wyliei fossils were discovered / Courtesy Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The infographic above shows sites in North and South Dakota where three Anzu wyliei fossils were discovered.


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